effington:

bramblepatch:

from Passing English of the Victorian Era
I’m gonna bring this back if it’s the last thing I do

I literally 4 seconds ago said “I’m melancholy tonight” - this is a much better term

effington:

bramblepatch:

from Passing English of the Victorian Era

I’m gonna bring this back if it’s the last thing I do

I literally 4 seconds ago said “I’m melancholy tonight” - this is a much better term

(via tumbloling)

nevver:

Them!

that had 666 notes before I reblogged FYI nevver:

Them!

that had 666 notes before I reblogged FYI nevver:

Them!

that had 666 notes before I reblogged FYI nevver:

Them!

that had 666 notes before I reblogged FYI

nevver:

Them!

that had 666 notes before I reblogged FYI

itscolossal:

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri
itscolossal:

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri
itscolossal:

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri
itscolossal:

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri
red-lipstick:

Antonio Gonzales Paucar (b. 1973, Huancayo, Peru, based Berlin) - Zapatos Que Rompen El Silencio (Shoes That Break The Silence) , 2009     Installations: 1,000+ Dead Flies, Nylon String, Pair of Shoes

UM! red-lipstick:

Antonio Gonzales Paucar (b. 1973, Huancayo, Peru, based Berlin) - Zapatos Que Rompen El Silencio (Shoes That Break The Silence) , 2009     Installations: 1,000+ Dead Flies, Nylon String, Pair of Shoes

UM! red-lipstick:

Antonio Gonzales Paucar (b. 1973, Huancayo, Peru, based Berlin) - Zapatos Que Rompen El Silencio (Shoes That Break The Silence) , 2009     Installations: 1,000+ Dead Flies, Nylon String, Pair of Shoes

UM!

red-lipstick:

Antonio Gonzales Paucar (b. 1973, Huancayo, Peru, based Berlin) - Zapatos Que Rompen El Silencio (Shoes That Break The Silence) , 2009     Installations: 1,000+ Dead Flies, Nylon String, Pair of Shoes

UM!

(via brxo)

“We open our eyes and we think we’re seeing the whole world. But what has become clear—and really just in the last few centuries—is that when you look at the electromagnetic spectrum we are seeing less than 1/10 billionth of the information that’s riding on there. So we call that visible light. But everything else passing through our bodies is completely invisible to us. Even though we accept the reality that’s presented to us, we’re really only seeing a little window of what’s happening.”
— David Eagleman (via likeafieldmouse)

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.
Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil
cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.
Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil
cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.
Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil
cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.
Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil
cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.
Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil

cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.

Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil

“Food doesn’t taste better or worse when documented by Instagram. Laughter is as genuine over Skype as it would be sharing a sofa. Pay attention. Take in nature, hold someone’s hand, read a book. But don’t ever apologize for snapping a photo of a sunrise after a hike, or blogging about the excitement of having a crush, or updating your goodreads account. All of these things are good and should be celebrated. Smile at strangers on the sidewalk and like your friends’ selfies. It’s all good for the human spirit.”
cogitoergoblog on Facebook (via liamdryden)

(via missfifilaroux)

nevver:

Who’ll stop the rain?
nevver:

Who’ll stop the rain?
nevver:

Who’ll stop the rain?